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Top Leaders Train, Reflect, Boost Performance

February 21, 2014 By: azjogger Category: Management, Training

From Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), Leading Effectively

A year and a half ago, Jean Bustard was at a crossroads. A founder and president of ADA-ES, a growing environmental technologies company, she was part of the senior team looking at acquisitions, creating new structures and leading change.

“I realized I was not as effective as I used to be. It was frustrating to me — and to others,” she says. “Was I capable of growing with the company? Or should we find someone else?”

Bustard turned to CCL, attending the Leadership at the Peak (LAP) program for top-level leaders.

I didn’t want feedback sugar coated

“I wanted to go where I could take a hard look at myself, where the feedback wasn’t sugar coated,” she says. “I needed to see what I was doing and what I could change to be more effective.”

Lorenz Gross also attended LAP at a pivotal point in his career. Gross is an international attorney and in-house EMEA corporate counsel with automotive and high-tech supplier Delphi. Last July, he was considering a career move.

“Increasingly, my interests leaned toward the business side, more than a pure legal track,” he says. “Corporate attorneys are, although part of the business, always somewhat on the periphery. I was looking at a possible job change that would put me closer to the heart of the business.”

“Leaders at the top of organizations, like Jean and Lorenz, have such a huge capacity to influence and impact the rest of the organization,” says CCL’s Rich Tallman. “Leadership at the Peak gives them a chance to examine what’s working and what isn’t, and to refocus their leadership efforts to meet their challenges.”

“Do I have what it takes to get to the next level?”

“On a personal level, LAP gives participants a venue to reflect on where they’ve been and what they want to do next,” Tallman adds. “They have permission to think about their careers and personal life and ask, do I have what it takes to get to the next level? And do I want to do what it takes?”

The in-depth and personalized assessments, reflection and coaching — as well as feedback and input from their peers — sets LAP apart from other executive education courses or workshops.

Bustard and Gross experienced clear and powerful feedback about their leadership effectiveness, as well as support and guidance for taking it all in. Along with their fellow executive leaders, they addressed communication and influence skills, the need to sustain health and energy for the work of leadership, and specific action plans for their pressing challenges.

“I certainly learned a lot about myself — how I behave, react and do things — and the impact I have on others,” Gross acknowledges. “And I realized that my career so far has been well-aligned with my interests. The time to reflect on that was very satisfying and valuable.”

“There is a big difference between my intent and my impact!”

Bustard, too, became more mindful of the impact she has on others: “I learned there can be a big difference between my intent and my impact — that was a blind spot for me. Now I pay attention to how people are receiving what I am saying and doing.”

“Another big lesson was to understand that I don’t need to be the only problem-solver,” she added. “My role is to get the rest of the company to be problem-solvers.”

Both Gross and Bustard stayed with their organizations, both have taken on new roles and/or responsibilities, and both credit LAP with providing the clarity and insight to move ahead as leaders.

As for advice to other senior leaders?

“Take time to reflect, know your value, when to step up and when to step back to let others add value,” says Gross. “And be authentic.”

Bustard suggests her peers should be more excited to try new things to improve as leaders. Drawing on her experience as a triathlete, she says:

“You’ve got to try it”

“I train to be better. I will do anything to make this 56-year-old person faster! Why wouldn’t I try to improve on the job, as a leader, where I spend most of the hours in a day?

“If I tell my runner friends, I got these new shoes and dropped 30 seconds off my time, they would be headed straight to the running store. That’s how it should be with work, too. I should say, I went to this course, I’m more effective now, here’s why — you’ve got to try it. We should talk about what we are doing to be better — and it should be exciting.”

Leadership at the Peak is for leaders of the enterprise. It is designed exclusively for C-level and senior executives in the top three tiers of the organization. To ensure participants have the optimum background to benefit from the program, admission is by application only. Sessions are offered in Colorado Springs, CO, as well as in Switzerland and Singapore.

Manager of Managers: 6 Factors for Success

September 20, 2013 By: azjogger Category: Management, Training

From: Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), Leading Effectively

Effective leadership can look different depending on where you sit in the organization. For managers of other managers — typically mid- to senior-level leaders — the view can be murky.

Functional or divisional managers, plant managers, GMs and managers with many other manager titles operate somewhere in the middle zone of organizations. They are charged with meeting the demands of top leadership and knowing the realities of frontline management. Managers of managers move up, down and across the organization as they bridge organizational strategy with everyday work.

 

What does it take to effectively lead in these roles?

One of CCL’s core programs — the Leadership Development Program (LDP)® — gets at the heart of the matter. LDP participants strengthen and refine their leadership fundamentals in the context of their more complex and demanding roles. They also focus on competencies that have not been essential in previous roles.

If you’re a manager of managers, or otherwise leading in the middle zone of the organization, pay particular attention to these six factors:

  1. Self-awareness underpins effective leadership at all levels. For managers of managers, gaining an accurate picture of who you are and how you lead allows you to adjust and learn. Seeking feedback from a range of constituents is an important part of handling the push-and-pull of competing demands and people. Be especially open to the idea that strengths which have worked well in the past may not get you where you need to go next.
  2. Learning agility allows you to process information and take wise action in rapidly changing conditions. Effective leaders seek out opportunities to learn and are able to learn quickly.
  3. Communication remains essential, with the recognition that you have multiple audiences as a middle-zone manager. Communicating and collaborating with peers — other functional or departmental managers over whom you have no direct authority — becomes increasingly important.
  4. Influence is about gaining cooperation to get things done and is closely tied to effective communication. The ability to influence allows you to move beyond mere compliance and, instead, gain genuine agreement, buy-in and collaboration.
  5. Resiliency helps you handle the stress, uncertainty and setbacks that are part of your job. These realities are not going away. The ability to stay focused on what matters most in the midst of pressure is a both a life skill and a leadership skill. Being resilient benefits your own mental and physical health while allowing you to be more effective in your management roles.
  6. Thinking and acting systemically requires you to act not only as an individual manager but also to lead in the midst of a system. Each of us tends to get engrossed in our own work and our own perspective. It’s important to step outside of that, look at the larger system, and ask, what is going on beyond my own level? Why is it playing out the way it is? What could I do differently?

As a manager of managers, you are pulled between priorities and people. However, it is also an exciting place to be in an organization. You are in the right place to work on interesting projects, solve problems and build relationships with a range of people. By clarifying your role, challenges and leadership skills, you and your organization will reap the benefits of your time leading in the middle zone.

Adapting to Change: it’s About the Transition

September 20, 2013 By: azjogger Category: Human Resources, Management, Training

From: Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), Leading Effectively   

You know change is hard. But did you know that the ability to adapt to change is the No. 1 success factor for leaders?

CCL research has found that successful executives in North America and Europe:

  • Adapt to the changing external pressures facing the organization
  • Adjust their management style to changing situations
  • Accept changes as positive
  • Revise plans as necessary
  • Consider other people’s concerns during change

But what do you need to do to adapt and respond well to change?

A new CCL guidebook, Adapting to Organizational Change, distills the knowledge and best practices that will help you flex and adjust during changing times.

The first thing you need to do to manage change and be adaptable is understand there is a difference between change and transition.

Change is defined as the situations and occurrences that impact organizations and individuals, such as a new boss, a move to another location or a shift in policy. Change creates the need to move from the way it used to be to the way it is now.

Transition is the internal psychological process of adapting to a new situation. Transition can happen quickly or slowly. It is the process of moving successfully from the old to the new.

Another key strategy is to identify how the changes affect your feelings and thoughts. For many leaders, change challenges their experience with being right or in control. Feelings of anger, fear, powerlessness or frustration, as well as being stressed and exhausted, are common. But if left unresolved, negative feelings and thoughts become more intense, which can lead otherwise successful people to derail.

A final strategy for navigating transition is to guide oneself through three stages. William Bridges, a leader in the field of change management, says transition involves:

An Ending. Let go of the past; honor and grieve the ending but accept it. To fully experience change as an ending, try some or all of these strategies:

  • Learn all you can about the nature of the change without first judging it.
  • Take stock of who is losing what.
  • Define the precise details of what is over and what is not.
  • Admit to yourself and others that the change has occurred.
  • Actively seek information from all relevant sources about the change.
  • Let others know the facts and feelings that you have about the change.
  • Mark the ending in a meaningful way.
  • Take note of what has been lost and what has been gained.

The Neutral Zone. This may be the most uncomfortable transition stage. This is the time of confusion, of living with a clear ending but having no clear beginning. It is also the time for clarity to develop and point you to a new beginning. Tips for this stage:

  • Realize that uncertainty is an integral stage between an ending and a new beginning. Don’t expect to know everything or to be perfect.
  • Set short-term goals to move through uncertainty and advance toward a new beginning. Take stock of what you need to accomplish those goals and identify opportunities that will help you move forward.
  • Look backward to the ending and acknowledge what you had. Look forward to the beginning and the possibilities it could create.
  • Connect to your values. When you feel uncertain and confused, your personal values provide direction.

New beginning. Utilize the clarity that developed in the neutral zone and accept the challenge of working in a changed environment. When moving through the new beginning, experience it as a fresh start. To do so:

  • Imagine what the new beginning looks and feels like. Symbolize the new beginning in words, images and thoughts.
  • Give everyone a part in the new beginning; find a place for all relevant parties to the change.
  • Create strategies for tackling new problems and meeting new challenges.
  • Re-emphasize the reason for the change and recognize that reason as why you are beginning anew.
  • Find ways to mark your success.

People experience organizational change in many different ways and the process of transition will vary. As a leader, you must deal with your own personal uncertainty and resistance to change. Recognize that your process of going through endings, neutral zones and new beginnings will affect your work and the people around you. With greater awareness of the human side of transition, you will be more adaptable — and able to help others adapt to change as well.

A Broad Perspective: A Must-Have for Promotion

August 17, 2013 By: azjogger Category: Human Resources, Management, Training

From Center on Creative Leadership, “Leading Effectively” August 2013

The more responsibility you have and the higher up you go in your organization, the more important it is to see beyond your own functional area.

CCL has found that a broad organizational perspective is one of the most important factors in the advancement of executives. Looked at another way, having a narrow functional orientation can lead to derailment. A promotion might take you beyond your level of competence — you may be pushed out, demoted or fired.

If you are too narrow in your perspective, you can expand it, according to CCL’s Ellen Van Velsor, author of the new CCL guidebook, Broadening Your Organizational Perspective.

First, determine what is getting in your way. It may be, in part, organizational forces. But it may be your own behaviors that are holding you back. Do you tend to:

Over-rely on strengths? Too much success in one area can lead you to over-rely on what has been working for you so far. Any strength can become a weakness, leaving you with a gap or limitation when it comes to the next job opportunity.

Ignore a flaw? You probably know your weak spots, or you’ve been given feedback about something to improve. Ignoring this insight is a missed opportunity — one that can potentially derail your career.

Avoid untested areas? If you shy away from a function or area, the lack of knowledge and experience may become an obvious gap. Don’t think, “I’ve made it this far” and assume it won’t matter down the road.

Focus on one type of work? Deep expertise is not a replacement for a variety of experiences. A track record of working in different areas or on different types of work demonstrates the versatility needed to move up in an organization.

Underlying these four patterns is the inability to learn, to take a risk and to be challenged by something new. So, go after a variety of challenging experiences — but be sure you will learn from them.

To boost your ability to learn from experiences, rather than just run through the paces, pay attention to three factors:

Willingness to learn. Understand that new experiences may provoke fear or anxiety. Your performance may suffer in the short term. What is your motivation and commitment to engaging in and learning from a new experience? How will you handle the emotions that come along with it?

Ability to learn. When going through a new experience you will want to determine what is important for you to learn. This requires vulnerability. Are you able to seek and use feedback? Do you learn from mistakes? Are you open to criticism without being defensive?

Learning versatility. You also need to understand how you learn — what’s your learning style. Once you’ve identified the tactics you prefer and use most often, you can try new learning tactics to make sure you learn the most from your experiences.

With a solid understanding and commitment to learning, you can find and create experiences to broaden your organizational view. As a result you will strengthen your overall leadership abilities, enhance your opportunities for advancement and improve your ability to adapt to an uncertain and turbulent world of work.

Developing Leaders Within an Organization

May 08, 2013 By: azjogger Category: Human Resources, Management, Training

By Andrea Zintz

The idea of having a succession plan is often associated with company  ownership, but it really applies throughout any organization. When leaders move  on-retiring, getting promoted or choosing to take their talents elsewhere-it can  leave a significant void that can be problematic right away and for the long  term.

Developing leaders from within is one of the best things you can do to  ensure you don’t end up with a leadership deficiency.

A number of best practices exist with regard to internal leadership  development, and they all have one thing in common: buy-in from the top is a  critical component for success. In addition to saying the right things regarding  the importance of “bench strength” and education/training, top leaders must  continually espouse developing leaders as something that’s a highly regarded  company value.

 

With that thought in mind, let’s take a look at three best practices that can  be used to develop leaders within an organization:

Have a formal executive development program in place. This can be  outsourced or run internally, and ideally it will be tiered, offering different  tracks for senior managers, mid-level managers, supervisors, and even those who  aspire to join the management ranks. With advances in online learning, leaders  can tap into programs from wherever they’re located.

It’s best to supplement  classroom training-which alone can end up being rather weak-with on-the-job  experience in the form of stretch assignments and team projects that accelerate  the learning process. However, collaboration and on-the-job reinforcement must  remain a necessary component.

Employees need to be able to put concepts and  ideas they’ve been learning to work, and they’ll benefit from receiving coaching  and feedback along the way.

Encourage leaders to teach. Education comes in many forms; it can be as  simple as having a discussion at a staff meeting about the work implications of  an assigned article or case study. When leaders take the time to share their  knowledge, what results can be quite powerful. Serving as a mentor or coach can  ramp things up even more, since that provides line-of-sight support and a place  to go with questions, and it may result in career-building opportunities for the  person being taken under a leader’s wing.

Pay attention to the makeup of your leadership team. The need for diversity  aside, it’s important to create an environment of inclusion, so people feel  listened to, and believe they have a path to leadership. Ask whether you’ve  inadvertently excluded women, people of color or those with varied cultural  backgrounds-and what valuable points of view you are thus missing.

I’ve heard an  analogy that diversity is being invited to the party, while inclusion is being  asked to dance when you’re there. When people are challenged to stretch beyond  what they know, that builds leaders.

When upper management supports these best practices, and makes sure that  developing leaders from within is part of the company’s organizational values,  the results will be far- reaching. Employees will understand where the company  is trying to go and how they can play a role in getting it there, and those who  seek to move into leadership roles will have the resources and  well-defined pathways to make that happen.

Andrea Zintz, President, Strategic Leadership Resources We are trusted  advisors on shaping the future through leadership development. Our business is developing current and  future leaders and leadership teams to build the capability for fulfilling the  strategic vision of their enterprise

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7681562

Leadership: Don’t Ignore the Young Ones

April 07, 2013 By: azjogger Category: Human Resources, Management, Training

From: Center for Creative Leadership, Leading Effectively Feb. 2013

It’s never too early to learn leadership, according to a CCL survey.

Fully 90 percent of respondents believe leadership development should start before age 18 — and certainly should be part of early-career learning.

The study, and CCL’s work with youth and young professionals, gives insight into what leadership skills matter most and how businesses can invest in next-generation leaders.

What should youth leadership development be developing?

Our survey — along with growing interest in CCL’s leadership initiatives for K-12 and university groups — clearly signals the need for leadership development to be a part of every student’s educational experience. If so, what should be the focus of youth leadership efforts?

One way to look at it is to consider what leadership skills young people need to enter the workforce. Here’s what we found from our survey.

The five most important competencies for young people entering the workforce today are:

  1. Self-motivation/Discipline
  2. Effective Communication
  3. Learning Agility
  4. Self-awareness
  5. Adaptability/Versatility

In comparison, the five most important competencies for young people entering the workforce 20 years ago were:

  1. Technical Mastery
  2. Self-motivation/Discipline
  3. Confidence
  4. Effective Communication
  5. Resourcefulness

Looking ahead, in 10 years the most important competencies will be:

  1. Adaptability/Versatility
  2. Effective Communication
  3. Learning Agility
  4. Multi-cultural Awareness
  5. Self-motivation/Discipline
  6. Collaboration

Notice that effective communication and self-motivation/discipline appear on all three lists — these may be core and enduring competencies that could receive more developmental focus during the high school and college years. Learning agility, too, is a “master” competency or core skill that fuels other skills and allows us to learn from experience.

Two competencies that appear on this future skills list — multi-cultural awareness and collaboration — are driven by the increasing interconnectivity and interdependence of our work and lives. Fortunately, these skills can easily be developed through project-based learning in high school and college, as well as through early leader development experiences on the job.

What can businesses do to develop next-generation leaders?

  • Seek new and creative ways to partner with educational institutions — universities and K-12 — to better prepare young leaders. Southern Methodist University’s Lyle School of Engineering is incorporating leadership content into the curriculum for all 999 engineering students. CCL has also begun a multi-faceted leadership development program involving students, faculty, staff, board members and parents for Ravenscroft, a K-12 private school in Raleigh, NC.
  • Provide support to existing youth leadership programs run by nonprofits and schools. Good programs exist but reach far too few students and are usually under-resourced. For example, CCL and the Greensboro, NC YMCA created an innovative program with 28 modules involving leadership and mentoring for African-American and Latino youth during their high school years. The work is now fully run by the Greensboro Y, but other youth organizations could benefit from program enhancements, financial support and mentoring support for programs like this.
  • Establish two-way, cross-generational leadership and mentoring programs. Pair a young person, either just in the workforce or soon to enter the workforce, with an older, experienced employee for co-mentoring. The youth have much to offer in mentoring their more experienced and/or longer-tenured bosses and coworkers — typically they are comfortable with technology and the pace of change, have good multicultural awareness and adaptability, are willing to learn and eager to make a difference. The more experienced leaders can offer insight on career direction, ideas for greater effectiveness, feedback and opportunities for development.
  • Provide leadership opportunities. Be sure your early-career employees have mentors and bosses who know how to develop others and will give them opportunities to practice their skills in a real leadership context. Intentional, planned job rotations, developmental assignments and involvement with a variety of projects and on cross-functional teams or task forces are effective strategies. Coaching and leader development programs are also good ways to build the self-awareness so critical for leadership.
  • Encourage employees to “own” their leadership role and development. Help people (at all levels in the organization) see themselves as the person in charge of their job, in coordination with others on the team and in alignment with the organization’s goals. Remind them that it is important to seek frequent feedback on  performance, get coaching (formally or informally) on areas where skills need to develop, and do all they can to learn outside of their current skill set and knowledge base. Let them know they can develop off-the-job, too — being on a local Board, directing a community project or creating something new on their own.

HR Pipeline: Connecting Strategy and Leader Development

December 18, 2012 By: azjogger Category: Management, Training

From: Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), Leading Effectively

In late 2008, the global economy was in turmoil.

Banking and financial-service firms faced unprecedented challenge and uncertainty — and UK-based Barclaycard wasn’t immune.

A renewed emphasis on customer needs and experience was essential

Even so, Barclaycard leaders were clear they needed to look to the future. A renewed emphasis on customer needs and experience was essential — and it would be fueled by greater collaboration, innovation and operational excellence.

“We needed leaders across the business to have a full and shared perspective on our direction and our challenges,” explained James Prior, Barclaycard’s former head of Executive Development. “At the same time, we had to strengthen key leadership capabilities so our people could implement the strategy, cope in uncertain times and flex to meet changing conditions and needs.

Joint effort yields impressive results

 Working with both the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL®) and Ashridge Business School, they developed the Barclaycard Executing Strategy Programme. During a two-year period, 120 managers participated. The effort earned rave reviews from participants and an evaluation study found meaningful results.

Participants made significant improvement in leadership effectiveness; collaboration and ability to influence.

Participants also showed measurable increases in their ability to take risks, set priorities, lead teams and coach/mentor others.

Direct reports are more engaged and empowered — 80 percent report feeling more empowered to do their work, and 79 percent also report feeling more engaged in their work.

The study also found participants are developing and leveraging networks and relationships to drive company strategies:

  • 100 percent increased both the size and quality of their internal and external networks
  • 100 percent improved their ability to gather multiple perspectives and ideas.
  • 100 percent leverage their networks to benefit Barclaycard.

Read more about Barclaycard’s Executing Strategy Programme.

Developing Leaders: Today’s Method’s vs. Tomorrow’s Problems

December 18, 2012 By: azjogger Category: Management, Training

From: Center for Creative Leadership (CCL),  Leading Effectively

The greatest challenge ahead is not a leadership challenge. It’s a development challenge, argues CCL’s Nick Petrie.

Nick Petrie took a yearlong sabbatical at Harvard University with the goal of answering one question — what will the future of leadership development look like? He looked across fields (education, business, law, government, psychology), reviewed leadership development literature and interviewed 30 experts in the field.

Gap between today’s methods and skills leaders need 

What he found was a profound gap between today’s methods of developing leaders and the skills leaders need to deal with more a complex, volatile and unpredictable reality.

The methods organizations use to develop leaders have not changed (much) in decades. The majority of managers are developed from on-the-job experiences, training and coaching/mentoring.

“While these are all still important, leaders are no longer developing fast enough or in the right ways to match the new environment,” says Petrie.

Petrie identified four trends shaping leader development — trends that top management as well as training and development professionals must grapple with as they figure out ways to prepare for the future.

In an upcoming CCL Webinar, Petrie will address these four trends and potential responses.

Vertical development will matter more. There are two different types of development: horizontal and vertical. Horizontal development focuses on new skills, abilities and behaviors. It is technical learning and competency-based. Horizontal development is most useful when a problem is clearly defined and we have known techniques for solving it. Vertical development, in contrast, refers to the mental and emotional “stages” that people progress through. At each higher level, adults “make sense” of the world in more complex and inclusive ways.

The methods for horizontal and vertical development are very different. Horizontal development can be “transmitted” (from an expert), but vertical development must be earned (for oneself). Horizontal development cannot be relied on as the sole, or even primary, means for developing leaders.

People must own their development. The current model encourages people to believe that someone else is responsible for their development — human resources, their manager or trainers. But people develop fastest when they feel responsible for their own progress.

“We need to help people out of the passenger seat and into the driver’s seat of their own development,” says Petrie.

Individual leaders are less important. Leadership development has come to a point of being too individually focused and elitist. There is a transition occurring from the old paradigm in which leadership resided in a person or role, to a new one in which leadership is a collective process that is spread throughout networks of people. Leadership development should focus more on what is needed in the system and how we can produce it.

The question will change from, “Who are the leaders?” to “What conditions do we need for leadership to flourish in the network? How do we spread leadership capacity throughout the organization and democratize leadership?”

We need a new era of innovation. There are no simple, existing models or programs, which will be sufficient to develop the levels of collective leadership required to meet an increasingly complex future. Instead, an era of rapid innovation will be needed in which organizations experiment with new approaches that combine diverse ideas in new ways and share these with others. Technology and the Web will both provide the infrastructure and drive the change. Organizations that embrace the changes will do better than those that resist it.

“The future of leadership development is evolving, with many paths and little clarity,” Petrie acknowledges. “The answers will be discovered along the way on the messy path of innovation.”

Developing Leaders: Today’s Methods Vs. Tomorrow’s Problem

November 23, 2012 By: azjogger Category: Human Resources, Management, Training

From: Leading Effectively, Center for Creative Leadership (CCL)

The greatest challenge ahead is not a leadership challenge. It’s a development challenge, argues CCL’s Nick Petrie.

Nick Petrie took a yearlong sabbatical at Harvard University with the goal of answering one question — what will the future of leadership development look like? He looked across fields (education, business, law, government, psychology), reviewed leadership development literature and interviewed 30 experts in the field.

A gap in skills leaders need 

What he found was a profound gap between today’s methods of developing leaders and the skills leaders need to deal with more a complex, volatile and unpredictable reality.

The methods organizations use to develop leaders have not changed (much) in decades. The majority of managers are developed from on-the-job experiences, training and coaching/mentoring.

Leaders are no longer developing fast enough

“While these are all still important, leaders are no longer developing fast enough or in the right ways to match the new environment,” says Petrie.

Petrie identified four trends shaping leader development — trends that top management as well as training and development professionals must grapple with as they figure out ways to prepare for the future.

In an upcoming CCL Webinar, Petrie will address these four trends and potential responses.

 Vertical development will matter more. There are two different types of development: horizontal and vertical. Horizontal development focuses on new skills, abilities and behaviors. It is technical learning and competency-based. Horizontal development is most useful when a problem is clearly defined and we have known techniques for solving it. Vertical development, in contrast, refers to the mental and emotional “stages” that people progress through. At each higher level, adults “make sense” of the world in more complex and inclusive ways.

The methods for horizontal and vertical development are very different. Horizontal development can be “transmitted” (from an expert), but vertical development must be earned (for oneself). Horizontal development cannot be relied on as the sole, or even primary, means for developing leaders.

People must own their development. The current model encourages people to believe that someone else is responsible for their development — human resources, their manager or trainers. But people develop fastest when they feel responsible for their own progress.

“We need to help people out of the passenger seat and into the driver’s seat of their own development,” says Petrie.

Individual leaders are less important. Leadership development has come to a point of being too individually focused and elitist. There is a transition occurring from the old paradigm in which leadership resided in a person or role, to a new one in which leadership is a collective process that is spread throughout networks of people. Leadership development should focus more on what is needed in the system and how we can produce it.

The question will change from, “Who are the leaders?” to “What conditions do we need for leadership to flourish in the network? How do we spread leadership capacity throughout the organization and democratize leadership?”

We need a new era of innovation. There are no simple, existing models or programs, which will be sufficient to develop the levels of collective leadership required to meet an increasingly complex future. Instead, an era of rapid innovation will be needed in which organizations experiment with new approaches that combine diverse ideas in new ways and share these with others. Technology and the Web will both provide the infrastructure and drive the change. Organizations that embrace the changes will do better than those that resist it.

“The future of leadership development is evolving, with many paths and little clarity,” Petrie acknowledges. “The answers will be discovered along the way on the messy path of innovation.”

Learn more! Sign up for Future Trends in Leadership Development, a CCL Webinar with Nick Petrie.

What Does it Take to Lead Innovation?

October 22, 2012 By: azjogger Category: Management, Operations, Training

From Center for Creative Leadership, Leading Effectively, September issue

Does your organization stifle creativity even as leaders push for innovation? Have well-meaning efforts to become “more innovative” stalled or fallen short?

In a new white paper, “Becoming a Leader Who Fosters Innovation,” CCL’s David Horth and Jonathan Vehar argue that actively pursuing innovation requires considerable resources and deliberate focus — and that innovation leadership is often missing.

A picture for leaders

In the paper, Horth and Vehar create a picture (and to-do lists) for leaders who seek innovation but have been frustrated by lack of results. They draw on recent studies, best practices and hidden gems, as well as their own research and experience working with individual leaders and client organizations. They share:

The differences between innovation thinking and business thinking — and how leaders need to manage the tension between them. Leaders and organizations that are able to switch between these two modes of thinking will find a powerful antidote to complexity and an engine that can help them thrive — even during uncertain times.

Two myths of innovation … No. 1: Individual Creativity Can Be Mandated and Managed. No. 2: Simply Unleashing Creative Talent Can Help You Navigate Complexity.

Three essential building blocks of innovation leadership — the tool set, the skill set and the mind-set. A collection of tools and techniques are needed to generate new options, implement them in the organization, communicate direction, create alignment and cause commitment. Innovation leaders also need a framework that allows them to use their knowledge and abilities to accomplish their goals. The mind-set is the fundamental operating system of the creative thinker and distinguishes those leaders who enable creative thinking and innovation from those who shut it down.

Horth and Vehar also offer specific actions you can take to help your organization develop innovation leadership, including:

  • Create a mandate for change, backed by a strategy that embraces innovation. If you are not senior enough to create the mandate, gather peers around you who share your passion for innovation and collectively approach those who can create the mandate, or scale it back to a level where you have authority to make it happen. Use the IBM 2010 CEO Study, IBM 2011 Creative Leadership Studies, 2012 Capgemini Innovation Leadership Study and other evidence to get their attention.
  • Model what it will take individually and collectively for the organization to become more innovative. It is particularly important for senior leaders to walk the talk. Make managing the tension between business thinking and innovative thinking a priority.
  • Communicate challenging strategic issues throughout the organization. Use them as vehicles for promoting collaboration and seeking creative ideas.
  • Create highly diverse teams to address strategic issues. Help them overcome limiting differences so diversity becomes a source of novel ideas.
  • Give people access to creative methods and experiences. Even those with creative potential get stuck. Readily available tools, methods and experiences help them reframe and think differently about challenges and opportunities.
  • Design and build systems to nurture innovation. Look for low-cost ways to test and prototype new solutions.
  • Champion ideas that don’t quite fit, and network with your peers to find a home for them. Actively break down barriers to innovation, including internal politics and destructive criticism, as well as hurdles, gates and other unnecessary systems.

Read the full white paper: “Becoming a Leader Who Fosters Innovation.”